Simpson et al 2008; Female Homo Pelvis

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Simpson et al 2008; Female Homo Pelvis

Postby AlgisKuliukas » Wed Nov 09, 2011 3:50 pm

Simpson, S., Quade, J., Levin, N., Butler, R., Dupont-Nivet, G., Everett, M., Semaw, S. A Female Homo erectus Pelvis from Gona, Ethiopia. Science 322(14):1089-1092, (2008).

Abstract
Analyses of the KNM-WT 15000 Homo erectus juvenile male partial skeleton from Kenya concluded that this species had a tall thin body shape due to specialized locomotor and climatic adaptations. Moreover, it was concluded that H. erectus pelves were obstetrically restricted to birthing a small-brained altricial neonate. Here we describe a nearly complete early Pleistocene adult female H. erectus pelvis from the Busidima Formation of Gona, Afar, Ethiopia. This obstetrically capacious pelvis demonstrates that pelvic shape in H. erectus was evolving in response to increasing fetal brain size. This pelvis indicates that neither adaptations to tropical environments nor endurance running were primary selective factors in determining pelvis morphology in H. erectus during the early Pleistocene.

ausell very kindly gave me a heads up about this paper, which I have now read. I think it might be worth discussing here.

Algis
Waterside hypotheses of human evolution assert that selection from wading, swimming and diving and procurement of food from aquatic habitats have significantly affected the evolution of the lineage leading to Homo sapiens as distinct from that leading to Pan. (p118)
Kuliukas, A., Morgan, E. (2011). Aquatic scenarios in the thinking on human evolution: What are they and how do they compare?. In: Vaneechoutte, M., Verhaegen, M., Kuliukas, A. (2011). Was Man More Aquatic in the Past?
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Re: Simpson et al 2008; Female Homo Pelvis

Postby AlgisKuliukas » Sat Nov 12, 2011 3:10 pm

AlgisKuliukas wrote:Simpson, S., Quade, J., Levin, N., Butler, R., Dupont-Nivet, G., Everett, M., Semaw, S. A Female Homo erectus Pelvis from Gona, Ethiopia. Science 322(14):1089-1092, (2008).

Abstract
Analyses of the KNM-WT 15000 Homo erectus juvenile male partial skeleton from Kenya concluded that this species had a tall thin body shape due to specialized locomotor and climatic adaptations. Moreover, it was concluded that H. erectus pelves were obstetrically restricted to birthing a small-brained altricial neonate. Here we describe a nearly complete early Pleistocene adult female H. erectus pelvis from the Busidima Formation of Gona, Afar, Ethiopia. This obstetrically capacious pelvis demonstrates that pelvic shape in H. erectus was evolving in response to increasing fetal brain size. This pelvis indicates that neither adaptations to tropical environments nor endurance running were primary selective factors in determining pelvis morphology in H. erectus during the early Pleistocene.

ausell very kindly gave me a heads up about this paper, which I have now read. I think it might be worth discussing here.



Note... "This obstetrically capacious pelvis demonstrates that pelvic shape in H. erectus was evolving in response to increasing fetal brain size."

Algis
Waterside hypotheses of human evolution assert that selection from wading, swimming and diving and procurement of food from aquatic habitats have significantly affected the evolution of the lineage leading to Homo sapiens as distinct from that leading to Pan. (p118)
Kuliukas, A., Morgan, E. (2011). Aquatic scenarios in the thinking on human evolution: What are they and how do they compare?. In: Vaneechoutte, M., Verhaegen, M., Kuliukas, A. (2011). Was Man More Aquatic in the Past?
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AlgisKuliukas
 
Posts: 443
Joined: Wed Oct 26, 2011 10:24 pm


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