Ecological Gatekeeper Hypothesis

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Ecological Gatekeeper Hypothesis

Postby JimMcGinn » Sat Nov 12, 2011 4:02 pm

That the human evolutionary record is "mosaic" is already so apparent as to be undeniable. It seems however that the final word on this phenomena hovers between those that are not aware of it, those that are aware of it but don't understand its signficance, those that chose to deny it, and those that wish to explain it away.

If we start from the assumptions that the human lineage has been niche specific (as it seems does both OoA and MRH) then neither of them is reconcilable with what is actually observed. There's really only one solution to this problem and that involves recognition that the homonid lineage achieved niche independence around 2.5 my.

I should mention, however, that how the hominid lineage actually became niche independent requires new thinking on the 2 to 4 million years leading up to the point 2.5 mya at which the hominid lineage achieved this niche independence.

Jim McGinn
Google "Ecological Gatekeeper Hypothesis"
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Re: Ecological Gatekeeper Hypothesis

Postby AlgisKuliukas » Sun Nov 13, 2011 7:48 pm

JimMcGinn wrote:That the human evolutionary record is "mosaic" is already so apparent as to be undeniable. It seems however that the final word on this phenomena hovers between those that are not aware of it, those that are aware of it but don't understand its signficance, those that chose to deny it, and those that wish to explain it away.

If we start from the assumptions that the human lineage has been niche specific (as it seems does both OoA and MRH) then neither of them is reconcilable with what is actually observed. There's really only one solution to this problem and that involves recognition that the homonid lineage achieved niche independence around 2.5 my.

I should mention, however, that how the hominid lineage actually became niche independent requires new thinking on the 2 to 4 million years leading up to the point 2.5 mya at which the hominid lineage achieved this niche independence.

Jim McGinn
Google "Ecological Gatekeeper Hypothesis"


Hi Jim,

Welcome to the forum.

As you've posted this under "Greetings" I won't reply about your theory specifically here. I see you've elaborated on it elsewhere so I'll discuss it there instead.

So, in the context of greetings, how are you? I remember you promoting your "Ecological Gatekeeper Hypothesis" on sap over ten years ago.

So, what's changed in your view since then? Have you won anyone over? How did you decide on this idea and what's your background of interest in human evolution.

If I remember rightly, you were as much (if not more) a target for ridicule and hostility as I was in those days, so I've always had some sympathy for your enthusiasm. I can assure you there'll be no such hostility here, not for long, in any case.

All the best

Algis
Waterside hypotheses of human evolution assert that selection from wading, swimming and diving and procurement of food from aquatic habitats have significantly affected the evolution of the lineage leading to Homo sapiens as distinct from that leading to Pan. (p118)
Kuliukas, A., Morgan, E. (2011). Aquatic scenarios in the thinking on human evolution: What are they and how do they compare?. In: Vaneechoutte, M., Verhaegen, M., Kuliukas, A. (2011). Was Man More Aquatic in the Past?
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