Sport and art

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Sport and art

Postby AlgisKuliukas » Wed Nov 02, 2011 8:14 pm

Why do some people love sport and some hate it?

I love football, cricket, AFL and pretty much any sport but I live with a family who, largely, are unmoved by it.

Desmond Morris' "The Soccer Tribes" was the trigger that first got me interested in anthropology and to me, playing or watching sport feels like a perfectly natural re-enactment of ancient tribal behaviour. But clearly others seem to be turned off by such primeval urges and long for "high brow", more intellectual, artistic past times.

Curious.

Algis
Waterside hypotheses of human evolution assert that selection from wading, swimming and diving and procurement of food from aquatic habitats have significantly affected the evolution of the lineage leading to Homo sapiens as distinct from that leading to Pan. (p118)
Kuliukas, A., Morgan, E. (2011). Aquatic scenarios in the thinking on human evolution: What are they and how do they compare?. In: Vaneechoutte, M., Verhaegen, M., Kuliukas, A. (2011). Was Man More Aquatic in the Past?
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Re: Sport and art

Postby gib the dag » Thu Nov 03, 2011 7:42 am

Well we have the Olympics coming here soon, i guess that's tribal at a different scale.
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Re: Sport and art

Postby gib the dag » Thu Nov 03, 2011 7:55 am

beach volleyball has its moments
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Re: Sport and art

Postby gib the dag » Thu Nov 03, 2011 7:59 am

that's a diving event amirite
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Re: Sport and art

Postby AlgisKuliukas » Thu Nov 03, 2011 8:20 am

I'm a fan of volleyball (beach or otherwise) - a very underrated and spectacular sport. Team sports are best, I think. More permutations etc. Having said that, I do like tennis.
Waterside hypotheses of human evolution assert that selection from wading, swimming and diving and procurement of food from aquatic habitats have significantly affected the evolution of the lineage leading to Homo sapiens as distinct from that leading to Pan. (p118)
Kuliukas, A., Morgan, E. (2011). Aquatic scenarios in the thinking on human evolution: What are they and how do they compare?. In: Vaneechoutte, M., Verhaegen, M., Kuliukas, A. (2011). Was Man More Aquatic in the Past?
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Ecological Gatekeeper Hypothesis

Postby JimMcGinn » Sun Nov 13, 2011 8:45 am

The questions here is not whether there is some other way to describe behaviors that are in my hypothesis. I'm sure there's many ways to supposedly describe this behavior. The questions here involve the plausibility of the scenario I indicate:

1)Is the environment I describe evident
2)Are the selective factors I indicate plausible
3)Do these selective factors indicate human/hominid adaptations

I'm not going to waste any time speculating about whether current theory supposedly answers one or two adaptations. Only a complete idiot would argue that since their hypothesis addresses one or two adaptations that therefore it is correct. This is why I consider SAT, AAT, Mosaic Theory, etc. to be idiotic. Despite the fact that it is plainly obvious that these simple-minded notions can only marginally explain the origins of a small subset of hominid/human adaptations (and this is if we give them the benefit of the doubt) the reality is that a hypothesis must explain *ALL* adaptations. My hypothesis is real science. It's not phony science which, unfortunately, is the status quo in all of anthropology.

What's significant about my hypothesis is that it actually answers the question as to how humans evolved. While everybody else is basically ignoring the group/social adaptations of our species with scenarios that start with some simple-minded description of a habitat water, savanna and then go on to speculate about what would supposedly make our ancestors stand up and begin using their hands and completely ignore/assume the existence of social and group behaviors/adaptations, my hypothesis describes the origin of *all* human adaptations--including bipedalism and hand usage--and link it to a selective scenario that clearly indicates human/hominid adaptations.
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