ADD and ADHD an evolutionary step?

Discussions about Waterside Hypotheses of Human Evolution or any other topic related to human evolution.

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ADD and ADHD an evolutionary step?

Postby kaidakallidagon » Tue May 07, 2013 5:02 pm

It is my hypotheses that people with ADD or ADHD are in actuality an evolutionary response to the massive expanse of data in our daily life. I think these individuals are hardwired to take in more data at a time.

I came by this theory based off of the people I know personally who have this diagnosis. I noticed that without enough incoming data these individuals were prone to boredom and distraction. An example of this is when my husband (ADD) studies for a test he needs ten (min) internet tab open, music, Netflix or YouTube, with the paperwork in front of him. Any less and nothing gets accomplished. A friend who has ADHD needs the same plus physical movement, be it only constant twitching.

It seems that people with this "disorder" function at such a high speed it makes the slower aspects of daily life difficult for them. Could someone with these "disorders" be taught to control them, so they can slow or speed up when they choose?

Should students with this be taught in a different method designed for the faster paced mind? Generally in a classroom the students become a problem for the teacher because, they jump before the rest of the class and the teacher cant give them data fast enough, without leaving the rest of the class in the dust. They are the minority and end up alone in front and board so they begin to horse around and distract the other students. This is not an effective method.

If given enough time will everyone develop a faster paced mind? Or will it evolve into an ability that the owner can control such as a talent? Can anyone further this hypothesis, support it, or think of an effective control to test?
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Re: ADD and ADHD an evolutionary step?

Postby AlgisKuliukas » Tue May 07, 2013 7:53 pm

kaidakallidagon wrote:It is my hypotheses that people with ADD or ADHD are in actuality an evolutionary response to the massive expanse of data in our daily life. I think these individuals are hardwired to take in more data at a time.

I came by this theory based off of the people I know personally who have this diagnosis. I noticed that without enough incoming data these individuals were prone to boredom and distraction. An example of this is when my husband (ADD) studies for a test he needs ten (min) internet tab open, music, Netflix or YouTube, with the paperwork in front of him. Any less and nothing gets accomplished. A friend who has ADHD needs the same plus physical movement, be it only constant twitching.

It seems that people with this "disorder" function at such a high speed it makes the slower aspects of daily life difficult for them. Could someone with these "disorders" be taught to control them, so they can slow or speed up when they choose?

Should students with this be taught in a different method designed for the faster paced mind? Generally in a classroom the students become a problem for the teacher because, they jump before the rest of the class and the teacher cant give them data fast enough, without leaving the rest of the class in the dust. They are the minority and end up alone in front and board so they begin to horse around and distract the other students. This is not an effective method.

If given enough time will everyone develop a faster paced mind? Or will it evolve into an ability that the owner can control such as a talent? Can anyone further this hypothesis, support it, or think of an effective control to test?


Thanks for posting but there are some pretty obvious problems with this that I can see even after only a cursory look.

Firstly, the amount of data in people's lives varies enourmously. Although I understan what you mean, personally, and know many people who would sympathise with you about this, there are millions of people who live in ways that haven't changed much in many centuries. The DSMV symptoms diagnosing ADD/ADHD are, presumably, no less prevalent in such societies.

Secondly, for this to be an evolutionary theory, one would have to make a case that selective advantage had occurred for the ADD/ADHD trait, in terms of fitness. In other words people with ADD/ADHD would be better able to survive and reproduce than people without. As the "data load" we see today, that I think you are referring to is a very recent phenomenon, this cannot have been the cause of it.

All the best

Algis Kuliukas
Waterside hypotheses of human evolution assert that selection from wading, swimming and diving and procurement of food from aquatic habitats have significantly affected the evolution of the lineage leading to Homo sapiens as distinct from that leading to Pan. (p118)
Kuliukas, A., Morgan, E. (2011). Aquatic scenarios in the thinking on human evolution: What are they and how do they compare?. In: Vaneechoutte, M., Verhaegen, M., Kuliukas, A. (2011). Was Man More Aquatic in the Past?
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Re: ADD and ADHD an evolutionary step?

Postby CEngelbrecht » Wed May 08, 2013 3:59 pm

This is kinda off topic for this general forum, maybe it should be moved to the ''Off Topic" section?
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Re: ADD and ADHD an evolutionary step?

Postby AlgisKuliukas » Wed May 08, 2013 6:33 pm

To be honest, Chris, I'm just grateful we got a post!

:(

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Waterside hypotheses of human evolution assert that selection from wading, swimming and diving and procurement of food from aquatic habitats have significantly affected the evolution of the lineage leading to Homo sapiens as distinct from that leading to Pan. (p118)
Kuliukas, A., Morgan, E. (2011). Aquatic scenarios in the thinking on human evolution: What are they and how do they compare?. In: Vaneechoutte, M., Verhaegen, M., Kuliukas, A. (2011). Was Man More Aquatic in the Past?
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